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Conference Schedule


3/9/2018
Time
Session Title
4:00 PM - 5:00 PMRegistration
5:00 PM - 6:00 PMNetworking Reception with Sponsors & Exhibitors
6:00 PM - 7:00 PMSession 1: Ethical Dimensions of Teamwork and Collaboration in Health Care

3/10/2018
Time
Session Title
7:00 AM - 8:00 AMRegistration & Networking Breakfast with Sponsors & Exhibitors
8:00 AM - 8:15 AMWelcome Announcements & Chapter Business Meeting
8:20 AM - 9:20 AMSession 2: “Do It Well. Make It Fun.” The Key to Success in Life, Death, and Almost Everything in Between
9:20 AM - 10:05 AMNetworking Break with Sponsors & Exhibitors
10:10 AM - 11:10 AMSession 3: Population Health: Foundations of Care Coordination
11:15 AM - 12:15 PMSession 4: Rapid Innovations in Care: Building on the Success of a Care Transition Team GWEP; A New Model of Care
12:20 PM - 1:35 PMNetworking Lunch with Sponsors & Exhibitors
1:35 PM - 1:50 PMDoor Prize Drawings
1:50 PM - 2:50 PMSession 5: Communicating With the “Impossible” Patient
3:00 PM - 4:00 PMSession 6A: Complex Care Service: A New Care Model for the Medically Complex Patient
3:00 PM - 4:00 PMSession 6B: What’s on Your Care Management Productivity Dashboard?
4:10 PM - 5:10 PMSession 7: Navigating the Continuum of Care; Dealing with the Opioid Addiction Crisis
5:10 PM - 5:15 PMClosing Remarks

Session 1: Ethical Dimensions of Teamwork and Collaboration in Health Care

John D. Banja, PhD
Professor and Medical Ethicist
Emory University · Atlanta, GA

ABSTRACT:
Everyone agrees that teamwork in health care delivery is important but operationalizing effective teamwork skills and strategies seems eternally challenging. Numerous obstacles to teamwork exist and often seem inherent in the very structure of health care delivery. Some familiar examples include specialization (and the way it might alienate or distance individuals or teams from one another), production pressures, role confusion, communication obstacles, hierarchical organizational structures, the challenge of speaking up, and, interestingly, the fact that teamwork may strike some individuals as psychologically threatening. This presentation will acknowledge and discuss these factors and then offer a host of strategies that might be teamwork enhancing. Importantly, however, a key factor in making teamwork effective is good leadership. Without leaders modeling and insisting on teamwork development and enhancement, good teamwork is unlikely to occur.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  1. Identify teamwork goals and characteristics
  2. Describe obstacles to effective teamwork
  3. List organizational remedies and interventions that might facilitate improvements in teamwork

Session 2: “Do It Well. Make It Fun.” The Key to Success in Life, Death, and Almost Everything in Between

Ron Culberson, MSW, CSP, CPAE
Speaker, Author, Humorist
RonCulberson.com · Nellysford, VA

ABSTRACT:
If you’ve ever had a boss who was good at what he or she did but was also fun to be around, you didn’t mind arriving early or working late. In fact, you probably loved your job. That’s the power of Do It Well, Make it Fun. It’s about seeking excellence but making the process of life and work more fun. Based on Ron Culberson’s book by the same name, this presentation shows case management staff and leaders how to create a less stressful work environment where people want to work. It also helps them understand that excellence combined with fun and humor can improve productivity, create better working relationships, enhance creativity, change the workplace culture, and lead to the delivery of better services.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  1. Recognize that everything is a process and each step in the process can be improved and more fun
  2. Manage stress more effectively by changing perspective and seeing the humor in life
  3. Connect and communicate with others more effectively by using empathy, clarity, and humor

Session 3: Population Health: Foundations of Care Coordination

Dana Pedrick, RN, CPC, ACM-RN
Administrative Director · Care Management and Population Health
St. Mary Medical Center and Quality Health Alliance · Langhorne, PA

ABSTRACT:
Accountable Care and Clinically Integrated Networks that take on risk programs require strong care coordination programs to support core components which will drive successful outcomes. This presentation will review the model used by Quality Health Alliance and outline the key aspects of this successful program.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  1. Identify resource needs for care coordination based on population and contract requirements
  2. Recognize multi-faceted approach to addressing quality and cost objectives
  3. Describe an ambulatory care model which supports a high risk population

Session 4: Rapid Innovations in Care: Building on the Success of a Care Transition Team GWEP; A New Model of Care

Laura J. Benner, RN, BSN, ACM-RN, CCTM
Population Health Manager - GWEP
Lehigh Valley Health Network · Allentown, PA

Cathryn Kelly, RN, LDN, CCCTM
Manager · Integrated Population Health
Lehigh Valley Health Network · Allentown, PA

ABSTRACT:
In the United States, approximately 10,000 people are turning 65 every day. Learn how Lehigh Valley Health Network is exploring a new model of care with the support of a Geriatric Workforce Enhancement grant to build on the success of its Community Care Team. This new model provides home-based, integrated care management for the patient, with a focus on Alzheimer’s and other dementia diagnoses. By teaming registered nurses, community health workers and technology, a guided care plan is tailored specifically to meet the needs of patients and their caregivers. Furthermore, 39.9 million Americans are providing unpaid caregiving services to adult. By expanding the existing care management team, the program’s focus is to create a model that enhances the patient’s ability to stay in the community, support the caregivers and aims to reduce their healthcare costs.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  1. Learn about the guided care planning approach to patient care management
  2. Define a Community Care Team and discover how this service is integrated into physician practices
  3. Explore the use of and learn about the integration of a Community Health Worker in a care management team

Session 5: Communicating With the “Impossible” Patient

John D. Banja, PhD
Professor and Medical Ethicist
Emory University · Atlanta, GA

ABSTRACT:
This presentation will offer numerous communication strategies that build rapport with patients, especially ones whose behavior is causing the health professional to feel disrespected, anxious, or angry. Topics will include the nature of the health professional’s labeling certain patients or family members as “difficult” or impossible; the nature of the health professional’s defenses when the professional is confronted with assaults to his or her self-esteem; the need to understand the difficult patient rather than succumbing to the temptation to emotionally react; and numerous “what to say” responses, especially when the communication seems strained or uncomfortable. This presentation does not aim at teaching psychotherapy, but rather simple communication techniques that build rapport in emotionally challenging situations.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  1. Explain how Psychological defenses might compromise building rapport with challenging patients
  2. Describe common characteristics of relationally difficult patients
  3. List empathetic communication strategies that can be extremely helpful in trying situations

Session 6A: Complex Care Service: A New Care Model for the Medically Complex Patient

Barbara Pacca, RN, BSN, CPN, CCM, HTCP
Case Management Coordinator · Case Management
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia · Bala Cynwyd, PA

ABSTRACT:
The Complex Care Service was initially a pilot program on a pediatric inpatient medical unit that serves a largely chronically ill population. Discharge needs and care coordination for this population are usually complex and include durable medical equipment, enteral nutrition supplies, home nursing services, complicated medication reconciliation and outpatient follow up with multiple specialists. The Complex Care Service now provides care for up to six patients on two inpatient units with plans for opening a separate inpatient unit dedicated to caring for 10-12 patients during their inpatient admissions.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  1. Identify criteria used to define the patient population for the Complex Care Service
  2. Define the roles of the case manager and continuity nurse within the context of the Complex Care Team framework
  3. Examine outcomes from the implementation of the Complex Care Service and expectations for continued growth and expansion

Session 6B: What’s on Your Care Management Productivity Dashboard?

Ann Marie Marks, BSN, RN, CCM
Vice President · Care Management
St. Luke’s University Health Network · Allentown, PA

ABSTRACT:
This session will provide an overview of operational metrics to support ambulatory care coordination and transitions of care management. Examples of care manager productivity measures including operational measures necessary to drive clinical outcomes and a sample scorecard used to review active cases in ambulatory care management will be covered. Included in the presentation, will be care manager considerations to support value-based contracts and lessons learned from both the payer and provider perspective, which is of increasing importance as health systems enter value-based contracts.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  1. Identify performance measures to help monitor productivity of ambulatory care managers
  2. Compare various quality metrics that influence the documentation and care management activities of care managers across a health system
  3. Discuss considerations of value-based contracts that impact care manager performance expectations

Session 7: Navigating the Continuum of Care; Dealing with the Opioid Addiction Crisis

Cole Glaser, MSW, LSW
Medical Social Worker · Social Work
The Reading Hospital and Medical Center · West Reading, PA

ABSTRACT:
This session will cover opioid use disorders and treatment including outpatient and inpatient levels of care in drug and alcohol treatment centers. The speaker will give a brief history of the opioid epidemic and assessment of substance use disorders including DSMV diagnosis criteria. Attendees will learn what level of care is appropriate for each diagnosis. Additionally, medication assists therapy for substance use disorders including Suboxone, Methadone and Vivitrol will be reviewed.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  1. Assess and diagnose an opioid use disorder
  2. Describe how to match the patient to the appropriate level of care based on the assessment and how to coach a patient to engage in the appropriate level of care
  3. Explain how medication-assisted therapy programs work and the research behind them, dispelling myths and misinformation

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